record

Thesis Info

LABS ID
00176
Title
Fields of Interaction: From Shadow Play Theatre to Media Performance
Author
Aleksandra Dulic
2nd Author
3rd Author
Degree
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Year
2006
Number of Pages
281
University
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
Thesis Supervisor
Ron Wakkary
Supervisor e-mail
rwakkary AT sfu.ca
Other Supervisor(s)
Laura Marks, Martin Gotfrit
Language(s) of Thesis
English
Department / Discipline
School of Interactive Arts and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences
Languages Familiar to Author
English, Serbian
URL where full thesis can be found
Keywords
Computatinal Poetics; Media Perfomance; Shadow Play; Ritual; Interactive Media Art; Antecedents of Contemporary Media Art
Abstract: 200-400 words
Fields of Interaction: From Shadow Play Theatre to Media Performance examines the emerging contemporary practice of computational media performance and its genealogy through intersections across shadow play, cinema and computational media. One of the ways in which media performance can be contextualized is by looking at contemporary performance forms that emerge from different traditions and cultures. Computational media performance invites us to look at shadow play and reinterpret it, with performative action and locality of place and community in mind. This research connects interactive media art with Balinese community-based performance practices. The interactive media art, in this study, is examined with a particular focus on issues that arise from using computational technologies in the context of performance. This research is concern with the relationship between computation and performance as a two elementary axes, using hybrid research methodology that integrates artistic process and outcomes, performance theory and cross-cultural study of shadow theatre. My intellectual concerns centre on the significance of collective performance structured around the work of computational media art. I focus on two particular contexts of interactive media art practice: (1) interactive audiovisual installations and (2) media performances. These foci, through the collaborative research of the Computational Poetics Research group, have provided a variety of artistic outcomes. The composition and presentation of electronic media, using capabilities offered by computation, extend cinema with its ability to braid encoded process with various media, narrative elements and participants’ interaction in the real time of the performance. The