record

Thesis Info

LABS ID
00117
Title
European Avant-garde: Art, Borders and Culture in Relationship to Mainstream Cinema and New Media
Author
Lanfranco Aceti
2nd Author
3rd Author
Degree
Ph.D.
Year
2005
Number of Pages
408
University
University of the Arts London: Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design
Thesis Supervisor
Prof. Malcom Le Grice
Supervisor e-mail
Malcolm AT legrice.freeserve.co.uk
Other Supervisor(s)
Prof. Laura Mulvey
Language(s) of Thesis
English
Department / Discipline
Fine Art
Languages Familiar to Author
English, Italian, Latin, Classic Greek, French and Spanish
URL where full thesis can be found
Keywords
post-modern, post-human, cyborg, cyberart, ekphrasis, digital art, remediation, hybridization, esotechnology, endotechnology, trans-media, intra-media, evolutionary media
Abstract: 200-400 words
This research analyzes the impact of transformation and hybridization processes at the intersection of art, science and technology. These forms of transformation and hybridization are the result of contemporary interactions between classic and digital media. It discusses the concept of ‘remediation’ presented by Bolter and proposes the concept of ‘digital ekphrasis,’ which is based on Manovich’s analyses of the interactions between classic and digital media. This is a model which, borrowed from semiotic structures, encompasses the technical as well as aesthetic and philosophical transformations of contemporary media. The thesis rejects Baudrillard’s and Virilio’s proposed concepts of ‘digital black hole’ as the only possible form of evolution of contemporary digital media. It proposes a different concept for the evolutionary model of contemporary hybridization processes based on contemporary forms of hybridizations that are rooted in aesthetic, philosophical and technological developments. This concept is argued as emancipated from the ‘religious’ idea of a ‘divine originated’ perfect image that Baudrillard and Virilio consider to be deteriorated from contemporary hybridization experimentations. The thesis proposes, through historical examples in the fine arts, the importance of trans-media migrations and experimentations as the framework for a philosophical, aesthetic and technological evolutionary concept of humanity freed from the restrictions of religious imperatives.