record

Thesis Info

LABS ID
00097
Title
Applications of Generative String Substitution Systems in Computer Music
Author
R. Luke DuBois
2nd Author
3rd Author
Degree
Doctor of Musical Arts
Year
2003
Number of Pages
164
University
Columbia University
Thesis Supervisor
Brad Garton
Supervisor e-mail
brad AT music.columbia.edu
Other Supervisor(s)
Fred Lerdahl, Jonathan Kramer, Paul Lansky, Perry Cook
Language(s) of Thesis
English
Department / Discipline
Music/Algorithmic Composition
Languages Familiar to Author
English, French, Spanish
URL where full thesis can be found
music.columbia.edu/~luke/dissertation
Keywords
algorithmic composition, interactive computer music, string-rewriting, generative grammars, audio-visual interaction, multimedia performance
Abstract: 200-400 words
The purpose of this dissertation is to create and explore potential taxonomies for using algorithmic string-substitution systems in the generation of music. The focus of the author's research is on using a specific category of string rewriting systems (called Lindenmayer, or L-systems) to generate musical material based on a musical primer provided by a live musician or musicians. The author explores and describes a variety of possible composing methodologies whereby a computer can generate, in real time, appropriate accompanying music and signal processing to a live performer. By experimenting with different taxonomies of mapping source material (live musical input) to accompanying processes (provided by the computer), an extensive system for generating a varied, yet systematically cohesive, corpus of musical work can be achieved. A series of short compositions based on this string-substitution process are included as applications of this system.