record

Thesis Info

LABS ID
00599
Title
Reclaiming the alienated Self: An examination of maintaining the Self amid cultural and technological changes.
Author
Monika Dorniak
2nd Author
3rd Author
Degree
MA Art and Science
Year
2017
Number of Pages
33
University
Central Saint Martins, University of Arts London
Thesis Supervisor
-
Supervisor e-mail
-
Other Supervisor(s)
-
Language(s) of Thesis
English
Department / Discipline
MA Art and Science, Fine Art Department
Languages Familiar to Author
German, English, Polish
URL where full thesis can be found
drive.google.com/file/d/0BxooF1DbfUMWa3Z3V3FTSTlEX00/view?usp=sharing
Keywords
Disembodiment, Mind and Body, Control, Anthropocene, Art and Science, Consciousness, Neurophilosophy, Human and Technology, Humanity, Postdigital
Abstract
The unpredictable shift from the natural world to the (digital) technological sphere confronts body and mind with a variety of new challenges. A lack of physical sensations, loss of identity and increasing self-awareness lead to isolation and alienation. Although neurological researchers are only beginning to understand the relation of mind and body, technological inventions are offered to the conditioned consumer who commits to alterations. Critical voices perceive the postdigital era as an awake nightmare that urgently requires models by which human being can live in balance with technology. Returning to past handworks and somatic practices, such as contemporary dance could treat man- made damages, yet reclaiming the self demands an examination of man-made failure and a collective solution. My work involves the interdisciplinary collaboration with contemporary dancers and handworkers, where I analyse the importance of habitual mind-, body- and groupwork through workshops and personal experiences. Furthermore I am holding ongoing interviews with professionals with different backgrounds, and undertook internships in neuroscience and fashion design. Secondary research on self and culture in psychology and philosophy function as sources of information and enrichment of vocabulary. This study is part of an ongoing research project analysing the changes of mind and body through technological alterations and sociological misconceptions (racism and sexism). In analysing these changes from a female perspective, and through interdisciplinary collaboration, this research will increase an understanding of underrepresented areas. Simultaneously it will be used for workshops in the arts to provide independent knowledge on Self and Culture, and to produce works that engage the viewer to reflect on the above issues.